Category Archives: Walking

Awareness of walking

These two videos visually support learning points that I support my students to integrate through movement using guided micromovements in a particular way of exploration. I encourage my students now to watch both of these videos to imprint the visual stimulus for growing envisioning techniques with a focus on transitions of the body’s moving parts.

Why is this important?

Watch this video again, however this time, raise your gaze up towards the hip joints at the top outside of the legs. Notice the weight being dispersed equally side to side with no effort. The movement appears to be dance like in the flow of easy counterbalance motions.

If you continue to observe the video again you may begin to view how lite the legs are with each step. With each separate step the legs response in a similar way as the feet. Using the ability to shift weight this way with through the bone the also shifts forward and back, and side to side. This is why bones have rounded ends into rounded joints.

Remember that the individual leg bones shift weight differently, in any given moment, as a response to the pressure in the foot. For example, the standing leg that bears ones weight is locked at the ankle, knee and hip when the other leg bends at the ankle, knee and hip.

Mentoring micromovement patterns in community learning groups I have observed that one of the biggest culprits to mobility is the loss of this natural counterbalance. In an earlier post I write about the hidden influences in our environment that are silent systems of learning interrupting these natural movements. I believe it started with sitting for long periods of time having a locked focus of attention in one area of function only. I have discovered the outcome to sitting for long periods creates a gap in one’s brain of the natural movement patterns through the bones of ones pelvis, hips, upper and lower legs, knees, angles and feet.

You will see the differences in how these people walk in this second video. In this video they are mostly picking up their feet and not using the ground to push off like the person in the first video.

Begin watching this video with a focus on noticing how both people lift their feet up and hold them in a straight blank like way. This takes an extreme amount of muscle effort which becomes more difficult to continue as one ages.

On second viewing begin to notice their hips. Both people do not have any sway that demonstrates counterbalance through their legs, hips and pelvis. Both of them have one side where the hip seems to bounce hard in the socket of a locked pelvis.  Almost as though wearing an artificial leg. As a Feldenkrais® practitioner I observe a stumble like action.

Watch one more time and lift your  gaze upward to observe turned heads. Each person is looking at the other in a state of intent focus on mental processing. There is no evident counter balance through the upper body. What I see is a locked torso that begins at the base of their neck. It is a much different pattern of walking than in the first video.  

I would describe the first video as effortless and the second one as having tremendous effort.

In the first video the pattern of movement reflects what each toddler has learned in order to roll over, sit up, stand, walk and run. In the second video the pattern of movement reflects what happens through the silent learning patterns in institutional learning systems – sitting in a chair to focus on tasks and memorization. Both these learning systems reflect right and left brain activities. They are both relevant to a healthy and productive life, however there is no balance of both systems. The silent organic and inherent one each of us was born with was replaced by the non-organic one created by our ancestors.

Models of learning are around us starting at birth and continuing into old age.  One never stops learning from the influences surrounding us.  These boards are an example of a learning model that imprints rotations patterns of  movement for those who are having chunky movements and balance issues.   Using these boards at set times throughout the day can enhance integration of the movement pattern, especially if one cultivates awareness of  different shifts in weight.  This pattern of micromoving can reduce inflammation and pain, and increase circulation.  

Beautiful Learning Moments with a Blue Heron

Blue Heron

Blue Heron

Yesterday a blue heron was along the water’s edge as I was leading a walking group by.

As  we where walking a participant had been talking and so our focus was not on the surroundings.  A thought ran through my mind, “look for the blue heron,” and so I looked up.  There, almost alongside of us, was the blue heron fishing.

How many times do we have these thought messages go through our mind and we don’t pay attention to them?

I am happy I listened this time as we enjoyed seeing this blue heron hunt for fish with no fear of us being watchers!  A highlight of our day that could so easily have been missed! One that brought us out of the story that was being shared into what was immediately in our surroundings!

Our walking lesson prior to going out in nature to walk was about noticing our immediate surrounding and how it influences us.  Many of us are unconscious of how our immediate surrounds stimulate pre-verbal responses.  It is a function of our brain-body connection we aren’t even aware that it is a part of our operating system!  This moment was a metaphor of that teaching!

Beautiful learning moments with a blue heron.

Westsong Walkway in West Bay ~ Monday, July 29th, 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.

  • SUMMER WALKING TOURS

We will focus on slowing down to connect and increase our experience.  So important in this fast paced world, even our thoughts and movements aren’t able to slow down!  Join us and explore  your fitness in a “new” way that is not focused on effort.  It is focused on turning the effort “off.”  Same fitness benefits!  Added benefit – see the beauty in our own Greater Victoria Communities……..

Register with renee@insideawareness.com for each tour of interest.  Cost – $10.00 (no debit or credit cards – cash only)

Saxe Point Park ~ Monday, July 22nd, 9 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

  •  SUMMER WALKING TOURS

We will focus on slowing down to connect and increase our experience.  So important in this fast paced world, even our thoughts and movements aren’t able to slow down!  Join us and exlore  your fitness in a “new” way that is not focused on effort.  It is focused on turning the effort “off.”  Same fitness benefits!  Added benefit – see the beauty in our own Greater Victoria Communities……..

Register with renee@insideawareness.com for each tour of interest.  Cost – $10.00 (no debit or credit cards – cash only)

Meet up @ 8:45 a.m. – Parking Lot of Saxe Point Park at the end of Fraser Street

During World War 2 a searchlight was installed at Saxe Point as part of the DND’s shoreline defense.  Today the park provides spectacular views of the Olympic Mountains and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Fine perennial and shrub borders and a large open lawn area overlook the water. Forested trails and beach accesses are set among mature Douglas fir and Grand fir.

For more summer walking with Inside Awareness 

Gorge Park ~ Monday, July 15th, 9 a.m. – 10;00 a.m.

July Walking “Experiences and Explorations” with Inside Awareness

  •  SUMMER WALKING TOURS

We will focus on slowing down to connect and increase our experience.  So important in this fast paced world, even our thoughts and movements aren’t able to slow down!  Join us and exlore  your fitness in a “new” way that is not focused on effort.  It is focused on turning the effort “off.”  Same fitness benefits!  Added benefit – see the beauty in our own Greater Victoria Communities……..

Register with renee@insideawareness.com for each tour of interest.  Cost – $10.00 (no debit or credit cards – cash only)
  • ESQUIMALT

Meet up @ 8:45 a.m.  in the Main Parking Lot off Tillicum Road

Esquimalt Gorge Park is located on the Gorge Waterway in historic Esquimalt, British Columbia.  When the park was developed more than 100 years ago, a key attraction was the establishment of North America’s first Japanese Garden. The Garden was originally designed by Isaburo Kishida in 1907. The Takata family operated a very successful Tea House in the gardens for many years until 1941 when Canadian citizens of Japanese ancestry were sent to internment camps.

Inner Connecting

Researching information on Quiet Gardens for an upcoming post on  Walk-Victoria.com I have come a video on the perspective of Walking as a form of prayer.

I wish to share this video and express how Moshe Feldenkrais developed Awareness through Movement® lessons.  Moshe came from the perspective of a person being attentive to their inner sensual qualities, in the experience of an isolated movement, while expanding and increasing  their awareness to include how isolated movements can expand to other parts of the body functions.  It is my experience that in this perspective of attentiveness a person may automatically go into the same inner connections as expressed through this video.

For me then, setting up a Mindful Walking Practice in my neighborhood’s gardens or on a local Labyrinth would be a multiple skill that would support the growth of required attentiveness  in my Awareness through Movement® and Awareness in Thinking practices.  It was with this focus in mind that Walk-Victoria.com was created!  If in Victoria it is my wish that you use the free resources of Walk-Victoria.com to find interesting space in our community.  If in other communities of the world, I hope you will explore and find beauty in your walks!

Posted by Renee Lindstrom, November 4, 2012, Follow Renee on Facebook  & on Twitter

WALKING WITH FELDENKRAIS – TAKING YOUR LESSON INTO ACTION

Fitness the Feldenkrais® way at Monterey Centre – 250-370-7300

Movement & Awareness  Classes – improving personal fitness & abilities 

  • Saturday, May 19, 2012,  10:00am until 12:00pm

Walking for more power and enjoyment. This workshop will begin with exploring why walking doesn’t need to be difficult. Learn exercises to become more efficient in your walking, whether you are crossing the street, going up and down stairs, or hiking on trails. Experience greater comfort and ease in walking through simple postural changes working with gravity. Movement that invites your muscles to participate naturally releasing their holding patterns and consciously understand how flexibility can add to the dynamics of walking on various terrains and surfaces. After a lesson involving movement patterns, we will head outdoors to take our learning experience into the environment to explore how to walk in action using the awareness of the recent lesson. Walks will leave from and return to Monterey Centre and will be different each session. Trails – Centennial, Coast to Coast, Lanes and Trails from Oak Bay Walking Trails
Registration – 250-370-7300